Information related to research method "archival research"

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Supervisors with this research method

  • Faculty of Education and Arts

  • Nat Sch of Arts

  • Professor Shurlee Swain

    My research expertise lies in the area of Australian and comparative social history, with a particular interest in the history of childhood, women's history, welfare history, religious history, history of the family and Indigenous history. I am the team leader of the Historicising Social Policy program within ACU's Historical Research Concentration, building on the influence which my research has had on inquiries and responses to Australia's history of forced adoption and abuse of children in out-of-home care.

    Phone : (03) 9953 3239 (Melbourne) Email : Shurlee.Swain@acu.edu.au

  • Dr Nick Carter

    Nick Carter is Associate Professor in Modern History. Before joining ACU in July 2013, he was formerly Head of History at the University of Wales, Newport (UK), 2010-13, and Head of History at De Montfort University, Leicester (UK), 2001-04. He has held Visiting Fellowships at the University of Southampton (UK), the University of New South Wales and Monash University. He is a specialist in nineteenth and twentieth century Italian history and historiography, including Italy in a transnational context and Fascist legacies. A/Prof Carter also has written and published on the topic of Britain and European integration.

    In 2013, the Australian Journal of Politics and History declared his book Modern Italy in Historical Perspective (London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2010) an 'instant classic alongside works by [Richard] Bosworth, [Denis] Mack Smith and [Paul] Ginsborg.' His latest edited book, Britain, Ireland and the Italian Risorgimento, was published in 2015 by Palgrave Macmillan. The book has been described by Eugenio Biagini (Cambridge University) as an 'innovative, sophisticated and multi-dimensional reappraisal of some of the key aspects of this fascinating page of transnational history'.

    Nick's current research examines the material legacies and memories of Italian Fascism in the postwar and contemporary periods.

    Phone : 4587 (Strathfield) Email : nick.carter@acu.edu.au

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  • Dr Hannah Forsyth

    Dr Hannah Forsyth is Senior Lecturer in History and ARC DECRA Fellow at ACU.

    Her Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher Award Project 'Are we all Middle Class Now? A History of Professions in Australia' is a three-year project 2017-2019. It aims to give an account of the growth of professions in twentieth-century Australia. It seeks to explain their relationship to changes in the structures and priorities of government and capitalism locally and through economic and institutional connections to international systems and organisations. She is conducting a statistical study of professions over the twentieth century and a political and cultural study of a selection of sample occupations, including Medicine, Law, Engineering, Teaching, Accounting, Journalism, Nursing and Social Work.

    Hannah is the author of A History of the Modern Australian University, a book published in 2014 by NewSouth Publishing. Hannah's research on the history of higher education has been the subject of discussion in the public sphere and she is a regular contributor to the media, in newspapers like The Australian and the Sydney Morning Herald as well as The Conversation and London's Times Higher Education.

    Hannah teaches modern history, historiography and Australian Indigenous History. She has supervised honours and postgraduate work in labour history, Aboriginal history, history of capitalism and gender history.

    Phone : 4621 (Strathfield) Email : Hannah.Forsyth@acu.edu.au

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  • Dr Margaret Hutchison

    Margaret (Meggie) Hutchison's research focuses on the history of war, culture and memory. She completed her PhD in the School of History at the Australian National University in 2015. Her doctoral thesis explored Australia's first official art scheme of the First World War and was shortlisted for the Australian Historical Association's Serle Award for the best postgraduate thesis in Australian History. Her first book, Painting War: A history of Australia's First World War art scheme, was published with Cambridge University Press in 2018. She is also co-editor of a forthcoming collection of essays on painting, memory and war which will be published with the University of Alabama Press in 2019. She has won several international grants and awards in support of her research, including an Academy of the Humanities Travelling Fellowship and an International Council for Canadian Studies Grant. She has published and taught widely on war and culture and is an Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

    Phone : 6130 (Brisbane) Email : margaret.hutchison@acu.edu.au

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  • Dr Karen Lamb

    I completed a Master of Arts at the University of Queensland and a PhD at Monash University, both in literary studies. My publications on Australian authors inlcude an edited collection of contemporary Australian short stories (UNEASY TRUCES) and the first critical book on Peter Carey (THE GENESIS OF FAME). In addition, I have over twenty years of experience as a literary journalist, reviewing books for journals and newspapers, most recently for THE AUSTRALIAN. I have held teaching and research positions in literary studies, creative writing, and media and communications at at the University of Queensland, Monash University and The University of Melbourne

    I have have experience as an editor and manuscript assessor for major publishers and was a Ministerial Speechwriter for the Arts, working from a government public affairs unit in Canberra.

    My most recent research publication is on the Australian novelist Thea Astley, a now critically acclaimed biography, titled INVENTING HER OWN WEATHER (UQP, 2015.

    Phone : 4112 (Strathfield) Email : karenm.lamb@acu.edu.au

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  • Dr Nell Musgrove

    Dr Nell Musgrove is the author of 'The Scars Remain: A Long History of Forgotten Australians and Children's Institutions', Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2013.

    She holds an Australian Research Council Discovery grant (2013-2015): A Long History of Foster Care in Australia: hidden stories of growing up in foster care in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

    This project is being conducting in association with Dr Dee Michell of the University of Adelaide. The project continues Dr Musgrove's association with the Federal Government's Find and Connect Web Resource, a website which brings together histories of out-of-home 'care' and archival holdings to help support Former Child Migrants, Forgotten Australians, their families, and all people with an interest in this part of Australia's history.

    http://www.findandconnect.gov.au/

    Dr Musgrove has a PhD in history from the University of Melbourne which examines the history of children in institutional 'care' in Victoria: 'The Scars Remain': Children, Their Families and Institutional 'Care' in Victoria, 1864-1954.

    She also has a Master of Arts by Research (History) from the University of Melbourne: 'Making Better Families': Family Welfare in Melbourne 1945-1965; and a Bachelor of Arts (1st Class Honours) from the University of Melbourne, honours year in history: 'Denying Diversity': The Policy of Aboriginal Assimilation in 1950s Australia.

    Phone : 03 9953 3208 (Melbourne) Email : Nell.Musgrove@acu.edu.au

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  • Dr Noah Riseman

    My research focuses on the social history of marginalised groups in twentieth and twenty-first century Australia. In particular I have researched Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander military service and the relationships between military service, citizenship, Indigenous rights and national identity. I am currently conducting two projects: one on the history of LGBTI military service in Australia, and one on the history of transgender identities in Australia since the early twentieth century. While most of my research focuses on Australia, I also have experience in comparative Indigenous history, particularly in relation to the United States and Papua New Guinea. I am available to supervise topics related to LGBTI, comparative and Indigenous history, particularly topics in the twentieth century.

    I do not update this RexR profile often; please visit my staff profile on https://webapps.acu.edu.au/staffdirectory/index.php?noah-riseman=&d=1.

    Phone : 03 9953 3226 (Melbourne) Email : Noah.Riseman@acu.edu.au

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  • Dr Ellen Warne

    I am an accredited supervisor for Honours, MPhil and PhD students. I have supervised postgraduate students working on Forgotten Australians; Domestic and Family Violence Crisis centres; midwifery in the era of professionalisation and Catholic women's organisations. I have supervised honours students on: the Armenian diaspora in Australia; immigation stories of Anglo Indian migrants; Immigration experiences of South Africans coming to Melbourne; and Polish immigration and community in the western suburbs of Melbourne and currently, on the social and cultural impact of African-American visitors to Australia before the 1950s.

    Phone : (03) 9953 3822 (Melbourne) Email : Ellen.Warne@acu.edu.au

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