Rev Dr James McEvoy - School of Theology (Faculty of Theology and Philosophy)

Fully accredited supervisor - Can supervise as principal supervisor

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James McEvoy is a senior lecturer in the Faculty of Theology and Philosophy, lectures in systematic theology, and is a priest of the Adelaide Archdiocese. For almost two decades prior to 2014 he taught at Catholic Theological College and Flinders University Department of Theology. His doctoral thesis was in the fields of theological and philosophical anthropology, studying the works of Karl Rahner and Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor. His current research studies the place of religion in the contemporary West and the church's understanding of its role and social relationships in that context. He is the President of the Australian Catholic Theological Association.

Contact

Phone :3982 (Adelaide)
Email :James.McEvoy@acu.edu.au
URIs : Staff Directory ProfilePersonal Website

Research Interests

Systematic Theology ; Practical Theology ; Philosophy ; Sociology of Religion ;

Methods Expertise

Historical Theology, Systematic Theology ; philosophy, social and political theory ;

Research Projects

No research project is currently recorded.

Selected Publications

2014

Leaving Christendom for Good: Church-World Dialogue in a Secular Age

2013

Religious Pluralism and its Challenges, in Being Human - Groundwork for a Theological Anthropology for the 21st Century

2012

Dialogue: Drawn into the Life of the Trinity, in Pacifica: Australasian theological studies (print version)

2011

Hope, Modernity, and the Church: A Response to Richard Lennan and Dominic Doyle, in Theological Studies: a jesuit-sponsored journal of theology (print version)

2009

Proclamation as Dialogue: Transition in the Church-World Relationship, in Theological Studies: a jesuit-sponsored journal of theology (print version)

2007

A Dialogue with Oliver O'Donovan about Church and Government, in The Heythrop Journal: a bi-monthly review of philosophy and theology (online version)

2006

Church and World at the Second Vatican Council: The Significance of 'Gaudium et spes', in Pacifica: Australasian Theological Studies